Mother Love
Hammar mother and Child, the Omo Vallet, Ethiopia
2011
platinum/palladium print

Distance
The Akan Fisherman, the Gold Coast, Ghana
2011
platinum/palladium print

Emerge
Tuareg Woman, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2007
platinum/palladium print

Sway
Akan Fisherman, the Gold Coast, Ghana
2011
platinum/palladium print

Twin
Akan Fisherman, the Gold Coast, Ghana
2010
platinum/palladium print

Nobleman
Tuareg Man, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2007
platinum/palladium print

Truth
Tuareg Woman, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2008
platinum/palladium print

Jinn
Tuareg woman, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2009
platinum/palladium print

Promise
Tuareg women, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2007
platinum/palladium print

Grace
Tuareg Woman, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2008
platinum/palladium print

Embrace
Tuareg Woman, the Sahara Desert, Mali
2009
platinum/palladium print

Anointed
Akan Fisherman, the Gold Coast Ghana
2010
platinum/palladium print

Jewel
Alan Fisherman, the Gold Coast, Ghana
2010
platinum/palladium print

African Future
The Turkana Tribe, Kenya
1988
platinum/palladium print

Binta
Peule mother and child, Mali
1987
platinum/palladium print

Dreamchild
The Turkana, Kenya
1988
platinum/palladium print

Young
Hammar Woman, the Omo Valley, Ethiopia
2011
platinum/palladium print

Conversation
The Turkana, Kenya
1988
platinum/palladium print

Lifeline
Hammar Woman, the Omo Valley, Ethiopia
2011
platinum/palladium print

Source
Efe Boy, the Ituri Rain Forest, Congo Basin, Zaire
1989
platinum/palladium print

Elisabeth Sunday

Grace

September 22 – December 6, 2012

For 26 years, Elisabeth Sunday has found her muse in Africa: a place of origins, devastating beauty, great troubles and unyielding expressions of life. She's traveled alone and lived among various original peoples who amidst a changing world, have clung tenaciously to traditional ways of life. From the hunter-gatherers dwelling in the primeval forests of the Congo Basin, to the nomadic tribes inhabiting the vast stretches of the Sahara Desert, Sunday's photographs reveal an interplay of invisible forces that connect her subjects with the world of nature. Utilizing a flexible mirror of her own design, Sunday photographs reflections that blend and dissolve the boundaries between her figures and their environment. Sunday's images express an intimacy with a corresponding strength derived from that relationship. She writes: "Mirror photography is much more than photographing a reflection, it produces a visual alchemy that combines the physical world with that of the great mystery….and captures some element that remains hidden in straight photography."